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A Beginner’s Guide To Losing The Man Fat!

The first thing I’m going to tell you is, don’t go on a diet. Why? Because most diets are not based on sound nutritional principles. Learn more from these principles, nutrition tips, and workouts!

Before we get started, the first thing I’m going to tell you is this: Don’t go on a diet. Period. Why? Because most diets are not based on sound nutritional principles. Instead, read this article to learn more about the basic principles of weight loss, along with some great nutrition tips and workouts you can do in the gym!

Losing weight comes down to one very basic idea: Take in fewer calories than your body uses. So let’s start by figuring out how many calories your body burns on a typical day.

How Many Calories Do You Need?

We’re all different, so the number of calories we need every day differs, too. How much energy you burn depends on your age, your size and weight, and your activity level. This total amount you burn is known as your total daily energy expenditure (TDEE). You can get a good idea of your TDEE by using this calculator.

To use the calculator, provide your statistics, then select “fat loss” as your goal. Pick an activity level that matches how active you really are. If you say you’re more active than you are, the calculator will give you more calories per day. If you consume all of them, you’ll gain weight. Only by being honest about your activity level can you start to lose weight.

Once you know how many calories you need, you can figure out what kinds of foods you should eat to get those calories. We can help you quickly figure out those numbers, then get you started on meal plans that’ll help you lose body fat—and exercises to help you stay strong!

What Are Your “Macros”?

The most successful weight-loss programs are the ones that combine a good meal plan with the right kind and amount of exercise. But meal planning can be intimidating at first. Some people grow up eating nothing but junk food and never learn about nutrition.

Foods haven’t always had nutrition panels on their labels, so many people didn’t have an opportunity to learn how to compare the macronutrients (macros) in the food they buy. It wasn’t that long ago that people never though in terms of protein, carbs, or fats. It was just “food.” We’ve come a long way since then.

Food consists of three macronutrients:

  • Protein
  • Carbohydrates
  • Fats

The human body is made mostly of water. After that comes protein. You need protein every day to perform thousands of functions in the body. Your body works by breaking the protein down into different combinations of amino acids, the “building blocks” of protein.

Carbohydrates are the preferred form of fuel for your body’s energy needs. Simple or sugary carbs have their place when you need fast energy, but for the most part you should eat complex or slow-burning carbs (we’ll give you examples of these later). The thing about carbs, though, is that after you consume all the carbs your body needs for immediate energy, any excess carbs will be stored as body fat.

Body fat has a number of purposes, too. Our bodies store energy in fat tissue, which also keeps us insulated from high and low temperatures, and protects our vital organs. But there are good and bad types of body fat. Most of us eat way too much fat—especially saturated fat and trans fat. We need fats, we just need more of the right ones.

Your carb intake can be a little higher on days when you know you’re going to be physically active. On days when you do cardio exercises like running or biking, you’ll lose fat faster if you work out on an empty stomach.

Protein shakes are a good way to get macronutrients after you’ve been working out. When possible, though, get your macros from whole foods.

There’s Food, Then There’s the Right Food!

Macronutrients

Protein

Good protein comes in many forms:

  • Lean red meat
  • Chicken (no skin)
  • Turkey
  • Fish
  • Low-fat dairy

This is just the beginning of the list of good proteins. Don’t be afraid to eat whole eggs, since most of the nutrients are in the yolk. Avoid processed meats, meats high in fat, and full-fat dairy.

Carbs

The glycemic index (GI) is a measure of a food’s ability to elevate blood sugar. In general, the lower the number, the better the carb choice. The best carbohydrate choices—the ones that are low on the GI scale—include:

  • Sweet potatoes
  • Yams
  • Beans
  • Corn
  • Brown rice
  • Oatmeal
  • Whole-grain products
  • Veggies (these are fibrous carbs)
  • Strawberries
  • Bananas
  • Pears
  • Grapefruit
  • Apples

Carbs to avoid include:

  • Cookies
  • Cakes
  • Pastries
  • Candy
  • White flour
  • High sugar foods

Fats

As with carbs, some people think that the way to lose weight is to cut out every scrap of fat in their diet. But you need fats to give your body the nutrients it needs—and to make yourself feel full so you won’t feel so hungry between meals. Some good fats include:

  • Cold-water fish
  • Low-fat cheeses
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Walnuts
  • Almonds
  • Peanut butter
  • Olive oil
  • Canola oil
  • Safflower oil (eat these in moderation)

Fats to avoid include:

  • High-fat meats
  • High-fat dairy
  • High-fat salad dressings
  • Deep-fried foods
  • Butter
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